Pages Menu
TwitterRssFacebook
Saturday 18th of April 2015
Categories Menu

Alternative Learning System



The Alternative Learning System in the Philippines, abbreviated as ALS, is a program by the Department of Education that seeks to help Out of School Youths, industry-based workers, people with disabilities, former inmates, rebels, members of cultural minorities, and other people who, for one reason or another, cannot afford to go through formal schooling.

It was first launched in 1984 under the name Non-formal Education and was primarily focused on helping its students acquire technical skills that they can use to earn a living.

After getting its name changed into Alternative Learning System in 2004, its focus widened to include literacy classes that are aimed at eventually granting elementary and high school diplomas to deserving students who were forced to drop out of primary and secondary school.

Community Learning Centers

ALS classes are conducted at Community Learning Centers (CLCs). Each city or municipality has a number of CLCs that  interested learners can go to. These CLCs can either be a public elementary or secondary school, a barangay hall, a room or building lent by a government agency or private company or organization, or any other vacant space where learners can gather together.

Each CLC has an assigned teacher called an Instructional Manager. Depending on whether they’re teaching a literacy class or a livelihood program, instructional managers can either be a licensed teacher employed by the Department of Education or certified practitioners of a specific craft such as professional reflexologists or dressmakers. If you have the spare time and the necessary qualifications, you can also volunteer to teach for any of the two programs.

ALS Accreditation and Equivalency Classes (ALS A&E) and Livelihood Programs

Students who are interested in enrolling in an ALS class are encouraged to visit Community Learning Centers. Once there, they will be asked whether they want to attend the literacy class (ALS A&E) or the livelihood program.

Students who want to take ALS A&E  will be given an oral and written test to assess their competency level. From the result of the test, applicants will be grouped with either the elementary or high school level. If the applicant has not attended any formal schooling before, they will be enrolled in the Basic Literacy Program where they will be taught basic reading and computing skills before moving them to more advanced classes.

Classes are usually held everyday, although how many hours a day or how many days a week a student should show up for class depends on the Instructional Managers.

If there are other responsibilities that keep students from attending classes, they are allowed to take home free modules that they can study wherever and whenever they want. At the end of these modules are questions and exercises that the students must answer in order to evaluate how much they understood the lesson. After they’re done with the modules, they are asked to return them to their instructional managers so they can correct them.

Subjects of Study

ALS A & E classes are divided into five categories called learning strands. These include Communication Skills (English and Filipino), Problem Solving and Critical Thinking (Science and Mathematics), Sustainable Use of Resources and Productivity,  Development of Self and A Sense of Community / Value of Collaboration, and Expanding One’s Own World Vision.  

By integrating these five learning strands, ALS A & E students are not only taught academic skills such as reading, writing, and doing research, they are also taught practical things that they can use in everyday situations, especially in a diverse and challenging work environment.

Livelihood classes, on the other hand, teach them practical skills that they can use to earn a living. These include cooking, dressmaking, hairdressing, and handicraft making among other things.

In some cases, ALS A&E classes are reinforced with skills training in order to help the learners become well-rounded individuals while keeping the lessons varied and interesting at the same time.

Duration of the Program

The ALS A & E classes takes a minimum of 800 hours to complete; however, this may change every now and then depending on the progress of the students.

By contrast, the duration of the livelihood program greatly varies depending on the specific skill being learned — going anywhere from three days up to several months or more.

Assessment and Evaluation

Just like traditional students, ALS A & E students are also given summative tests to assess their understanding of the things that have been taught to them. These tests come in the form of multiple-choice, fill in the blanks, and essay type questions that the students must answer based on what they’ve learned.

After they’ve graduated from the class, students are then encouraged to take the Alternative Learning System Accreditation & Equivalency Test in order to get certificates that are equivalent to diplomas received by traditional elementary and high school graduates. Following are links for Alternative Learning System Accreditation & Equivalency Test 2012 and ALS Frequently Asked Questions.

Students of the livelihood programs also go through assessment and evaluation. They do this by taking TESDA’s National Certification (NC) exam for the skill they tried to learn. By passing this exam, they can get certifications that will make them eligible for employment both here and abroad.


The Alternative Learning System in the Philippines, abbreviated as ALS, is a program by the Department of Education that seeks to help Out of School Youths, industry-based workers, people with disabilities, former inmates, rebels, members of cultural minorities, and other people who, for one reason or another, cannot afford to go through formal schooling. It was first launched in 1984 under the name Non-formal Education and was primarily focused on helping its students acquire technical skills that they can use to earn a living. After getting its name changed into Alternative Learning System in 2004, its focus widened to include literacy classes …


<a href="http://www.courses.com.ph/alternative-learning-system/"> Alternative Learning System</a>


You may also be interested in



The contents of the comments section are the personal advice and opinions of their respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of courses.com.ph. We reserve the right to remove any materials that we consider to be malicious, inappropriate, or in violation of existing laws in the Philippines.

162 Comments

  1. kailan po ba ang.registration dito?.t near manila po sana kung meron po?

  2. Hello po itatanong ko po sana kung saan my malapit na ALS dito location ko po malate manila.

  3. may als din poh ba para sa mga ofw..hindi natapos ang pag aaral?

    • Hi, Rene!

      Yes, the ALS is open to all Filipinos who were not able to finish their basic or secondary education. DepEd also offers the ALS A & E Test at selected countries overseas to cater to Filipinos working or living abroad.

      :)

      • nasa abroad poh kc ako now..pwede poh ba ako mag take ng als kahit nasa abroad ako..ohh pag umuwi poh ba ako pwede na agad mag take…ilang buwan poh ang itatagal..salamat poh godbless

        • Hi, Reneboy!

          Last time we talked to an ALS coordinator, ALS students can access the modules on the internet, so you can study at your location of your choice and at your own pace. The Bureau of Alternative Learning System also conducts exams at certain locations overseas for Filipinos working abroad, so we believe you can also take the test once you’ve completed the program.

          We’re not sure if there have been any recent developments that we may not be aware of, though, so you might want to check with the Department of Education / Bureau of Alternative Learning System to be sure.

          :)

      • Hello ask ko lang po kasi base po dun sa taas nabasa ko taas pwede po ba yung home base habang nag aaral sa als ? Buntis po kasi ako parang di ko po kaya ng regular papasok sa mga brgy hall ng als pwede po ba yung home base lang po ako habang nag aaral ? Pwede po ba sa bahay nalang pag aralan yung mga module? Thanks po sa sagot

  4. Graduate po ako ng als nung September 2006 nasunugan po kc kmi nadamay ung card at diploma q.. Pwd po b ulit ako makakuha ng copy? Gusto ko po kc ipag patuloy ung pag aaral ko..

  5. Tanong ko lang po kelan po pwde mapa enroll kc
    Kc po gusto ko po mag skul ulit at my online als po b kau?1st year lang ntpos ko kc po ngkatulong n ako.at San po may malpit dto same fb harrison st.tnx po

  6. Tourism course offered?
    Let me know tanx

  7. Hi…ask Ku lng po pwde mag enroll sa als sa online kc po nag work po ako bilang katulong gstu Ku po mktps ng pag aaral .pls reply po .thanks.

  8. If im graduate by als can i enroll in any Collage or University school

  9. Ngayong january p ba pwedi p akong mag enroll s als

  10. Ako po ay nakapagtapos ng als nung 2006.problema po nawala yung card at sa diploma ko po nabura po ung name ko.anu po ba ang gagawin ko?kukuha po b uli ako ng test,san po ako kukuha?gusto ko po kasi mag-aral at makapagtrabaho.pakisend po sa akin ang dapat ko po puntahan.silang,cavite po location ko.maraming salamat po

Post a Reply